Monthly Archives: February 2015

#SUNDAYPIXred – 1st March 2015

DSCN0394Not many of you fancied putting your undies on your head for me last time out (spoilsports), so let’s make the next theme nice and simple and wide and not at all underwear-related:

 

Red

 

Take a photograph that embodies Red in some way. Be as imaginative as you like. The colour red does not have to appear in the photo, as long as the idea of Red is imparted. Post your pics to Twitter on Sunday DSCF9913(including the hashtag #SUNDAYPIXred in your tweet) and enjoy the hashtag. As ever, photographs must be yours (or your family’s or your secret lover’s) – nowt just nicked off the internet. Yes, you can post an old pic you’ve previously taken, or even one from your family history. Follow the hashtag (click on it in any tweet or add a column to your app) on Sunday to see what others have made of the theme. You are encouraged, nay ordered, to comment on other Sundaypickers’ tweets and admire.

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#SUNDAYPIXalbumcover – 15th February 2015

B6iUgbTIgAAR7s1“When we visit a castle, we always take a selfie. I also always take an ‘album cover’ shot of himself. Here’s today’s”. Thus spake @phantom_blonde a few weeks ago, prompting this #SUNDAYPIX theme:

 

Album Cover

 

Take a photograph that you could use for the cover of your first (or third, if you’re @rachaelkanute) album. Post your pics to Twitter on Sunday (including the hashtag #SUNDAYPIXalbumcover in your tweet) and enjoy the hashtag countdown. It’s entirely up to you whether you crop it square, but it would look more like. B6iUgbTIgAAR7s1It’s also up to you whether you add text, as I have in the second example of @phantom_blonde’s pic. As ever, photographs must be yours (or your family’s or your secret lover’s) – nowt just nicked off the internet. Yes, you can post an old pic you’ve previously taken, or even one from your family history. Follow the hashtag (click on it in any tweet or add a column to your app) on Sunday to see what others have made of the theme. You are encouraged, nay ordered, to comment on other Sundaypickers’ tweets and admire.

 

Here’s another quick one I knocked up from a photo of me in the Sixties –

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God’s great alphabet

Embedded road sign, WalesYou only have to Google ‘trees eating things’, of course, to find lots of examples of the power of trees to absorb, including this remarkable picture, but this occasion on the right here, unimaginably far back in 2000, was the first time I’d ever come across such a thing. It fascinated me, as you will see by the expression on that innocent face. It led me to think about the inexorable, irresistible force of trees, a power that goes mostly unnoticed because it’s so gradual. It also led me to the realisation that trees are the most powerful beings on earth. Not only for this ability to encroach upon and absorb anything in their path, but also because they hold our existence in their roots and branches. If we do, finally, disastrously, end up killing them all, then we’ll all die too, and good riddance.

(The title is a quote from Leonora Speyer)

Leeds Library & Art Gallery

A remarkably beautiful building, as I discovered when I visited on Saturday.

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The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

B53OnFMIUAAnp0S.jpg largeI once told a good friend that trees make a reasonable metaphor for people’s lives – each bifurcation, each branching off, representing a path taken or not taken at different points in our individual existences. I was thinking about that when I took this photograph, and wondering to which of the tiny snow-limned twiglets at the top of the tree my personal life decisions had taken me. Would different choices have taken me to a stronger, or higher branch? Most likely, but then again the twig where I am now does have a reasonable view and is at least high in the air, rather than being a stunted limb much further down.

Aside from all that, I like this photo simply because snow on trees is so very beautiful. I also like this picture because it has in it the stick that I made myself, from young offshoots of ash in Chesham Wood. I chose a slightly bent stick deliberately, as it was far more interesting than its perfectly straight brethren.

Trees. Love ‘em.

The title of this post is a quote from Nelson Henderson.

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